According to Zoom pro, Gerald Swindle, the new, over-sized Magnum Finesse worm will give anglers more options when fishing is tough.

Bulkier than the average finesse worm, the Magnum Finesse Worm will move more water and has the ability to handle larger hooks. Both of these elements are key to the popularity of the new worm.

“We all know finesse worms are go-to baits in cold water when the flipping bite is tough,” Swindle said. “This bait will add more bulk and is bigger than the normal worm, but still has the same, short profile which is important, too. Because it’s larger, I can flip it even if the water is a little more off-colored.”

“We all know finesse worms are go-to baits in cold water when the flipping bite is tough,” Swindle said. “This bait will add more bulk and is bigger than the normal worm, but still has the same, short profile which is important, too. Because it’s larger, I can flip it even if the water is a little more off-colored.”

With the ability to sustain larger hooks and still maintain a natural look in the water, Swindle knows the Magnum Finesse Worm will be a popular bait as the 2009 tournament season approaches. It will be great on lakes such as Amistad and Guntersville when anglers are targeting 4-to 5-pound bass.

According to Swindle, there are three main ways to rig and work the new worm: Flipping on a Texas rig, fishing with a Carolina Rig, and lastly, one Swindle might use often next year, fishing it weightless.

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“When flipping, I’d Texas rig the Magnum Finesse Worm with a 1/4-ounce weight,” Swindle said. “I’d use a 7-foot, 4-inch medium action flipping stick, a 6:3:1 reel and 17-pound fluorocarbon. This will be great on Lake Toho around the reeds.”

A 4/O, straight shank worm hook will be best when using a Carolina Rig, and fishing shell beds on Lake Guntersville in May will be a perfect time to try it out. This worm will perform best on a 7-foot, 2-inch medium rod, with the same reel as the Texas-rigged worm and 20-pound fluorocarbon on the base line with 16-pound test on the leader.

Fishing the new Magnum Finesse Worm weightless on a spinning rod may be a new concept to some, but Swindle is excited about the possibility.

“I will fish it like a miniature worm, tossing it around shallow vegetation, wood and boat docks,” Swindle said. “It’s going to fall slowly and the fish will react really well to it.”

A 3 OT hook and 10-pound test will be key to fishing the worm weightless. According to Swindle, Lake Champlain in June will be a great place to try this one out when fishing for bedding smallmouth. Also key will be a 6-foot, 6-inch rod, medium action and a 5:3:1 spinning reel.

In addition to the many uses, the color selection from Zoom is extensive.

“The colors of the baits say it all,” Swindle added. “Zoom has unmatched colors – better than any other plastic company in the world. The choices are endless and the colors are always right on target. Watermelon is truly watermelon. The colors are crisp, clean and exactly what they say on the pack. There is no variation from one pack to another.”

Whether flipping and pitching, Carolina rigging or fishing it weightless, the Magnum Finesse Worm will be a go-to bait for many. It will be available initially in the following colors: Junebug, Pumpkin, Watermelon Seed, Red Bug, Green Pumpkin, Black, Watermelon Red, Watermelon Candy and Watermelon Candy Red.

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4 Comments

  1. Been catching good largemouths in Alabama on this worm for about a year now, texas rigging in shallow water and carolina rigging in the deeper shell beds. Have caught 4 over 7 and 2 over 8 with the worm. It will catch big fish just as well as any other worm I’ve thrown in years.

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